BlueSky editing does more than simply fix grammar and punctuation mistakes. It makes your written English a strength, by improving clarity, flow, and word usage. Below are some examples of BlueSky editing.

 

From an ethnography of a cement plant in the Philippines

BEFORE:

The quarry land dispute PCC experienced in 1998 did not last long. It suspended plant operations temporarily, but they resumed soon. How was this possible? In its attempt to come up with a solution, PCC coordinated all the key players and utilized its good reputation, both developed through the years of its comrel activities.

AFTER:

The 1998 quarry land title dispute, as described above, was settled in court, but not before it caused plant operations to be shut down temporarily. Still, the shut-down was a brief one, and the financial damage it caused the company was kept to a minimum. How was this possible? The answer is that PCC mobilized key players in its community network and utilized the positive reputation it had built up through its years of “comrel” (community relations) activities to defuse the situation and quickly return quarry and plant operations to normal.

From a paper on Thomas Hardy’s novel Under the Greenwood Tree

BEFORE:

In this paper, we first discussed how Fancy’s acceptance of Maybold’s marriage proposal may jeopardise her married life with Dick. Next, we showed how her acceptance of this proposal results from her unstable position in her family and her desire to escape from her stepmother, Jane. Hardy’s first masterpiece, Under the Greenwood Tree, has been regarded as an idyll embodying a pastoral world. Therefore, the family ties it portrays are prone to be considered warm and cordial. However, as we have seen, Fancy has little affection towards Jane and the future tragedy arises from the cold relationship with her.

AFTER:

In this paper, we have shown how Fancy’s acceptance of Maybold’s marriage proposal threatens to jeopardise her married life with Dick, and argued that her acceptance of this proposal is a result of her unstable position in her family and her desire to escape from her stepmother, Jane. Under the Greenwood Tree has been regarded as an idyll, embodying a pastoral world where family ties are warm and cordial. But underneath the novel’s pastoral surface lie dysfunctional family relationships that foreshadow a troubled future for the newly-married couple at the center of the “all ends happily” conclusion of this book.

From a dissertation about Japanese culture

BEFORE:

Japanese culture have a space called Ma. Litarally means space/empty time. For Ikebana, the big difference between Japanese style and westerns style is space. By having space, one flower can stand out more and in between the space, we can fill in something. This is like Japanese poem Haiku, which consist of 5-7-5 syllables. These only a few word and express everything. On the other hand western poem tend to express everything.

AFTER:

In Japanese there is a word “ma,” which means an empty space, or a pause in time. The major difference between Japanese ikebana and Western flower arrangement is that ikebana leaves more ma, or empty space, between the flowers. This space lets individual flowers stand out more, and leaves room for viewers to “fill in” something. In this sense, ikebana is similar to the short Japanese poetry form haiku—17 syllables in three lines of 5-7-5. Haiku have few words, which leaves much up to the imagination of the reader or listener. In contrast, Western poems tend to express everything.

From a book on the “Turkish model”

BEFORE:

“Turkish model” (TM), as generally understood, is suggestion of the Turkish experiences as an example on the areas such as governance and economy for the pro “Arab Spring” transiting societies which have been in pursuit of new systems to implement in their countries. Since the term has been utilized by the diplomats and politicians several years ago, there have been a lively debate on it in the media; and dozens of researches were conducted in the academia as well. Despite of the current unattractiveness of Turkey, contrary to the positive image of the country until just recently, which is because of the latest diplomatic dilemma in the region that has been described in the expression of “’from zero problem with the neighbors’ which was an often used phrase of Mr Davutoglu, then Foreign Minister now PM of Turkey, to ‘worthy solitude’ that was a phrase used to justify Turkey’s isolated stance”; and social polarization between the present regime and the dissidents at home, Turkey has been still one of the promising countries of the region with a better reputation among ordinary Muslims.

AFTER:

The “Turkish model” (TM), as it is generally understood, is the idea that the experiences of Turkey in areas such as governance and economic management may serve as a useful model for “Arab Spring” transitioning societies which are pursuing new systems to implement in their countries. Since the term began to be used by diplomats and politicians several years ago, there has been a lively debate on it in the media, as well as dozens of research studies in academia. Despite recent problematic developments in Turkey, which have shifted the country’s image from “zero problems with the neighbors”—a phrase that was often used by previous Foreign Minister and current Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu—to “worthy solitude”—a phrase now used to justify Turkey’s more isolated position, and despite social polarization between the present regime and domestic dissidents, Turkey remains one of the more promising countries of the region, with a generally positive reputation among ordinary Muslims.

From the abstract of a paper on synesthetic sound iconicity (sound-meaning relationships which are inherent and thus neither arbitrary nor language-specific)

BEFORE:

This paper reports results of five experiments, in which implicit cross-modal associations between visual and acoustic non-semantic stimuli with stimuli depicting a value within the dipolar semantic dimensions of valence and activity were assessed. Based on previous research, it was hypothesized that angular shapes and plosive sounds on the one hand and roundish shapes and continuant sounds on the other share common implicit associations with the semantic categories of happy and active vs. sad and inactive, respectively.

AFTER:

This paper reports results from five experiments which assessed implicit cross-modal associations between non-semantic visual and acoustic stimuli and semantic stimuli varying on the dimensions of valence and activity. Based on previous research, it was hypothesized that angular shapes and plosive sounds share common implicit associations with the semantic categories of ‘happy’ and ‘active,’ and that roundish shapes and continuant sounds share common implicit associations with the semantic categories of ‘sad’ and ‘inactive.’